handslive: (writing)
This was a first novel?  Wow.

Okay, actually I can tell in a few very minor places that this is a first novel (eg. "impossibly fast" gets used a fair bit, like two or three times in a single fight scene), but I loved this book.  It twists and turns; it amazes; it amuses; it scared the crap out of me once or twice.

Sadly, I see from Amazon that they're only expecting the next book in August 2007.  This should give me time to get my own copy of this book in preparation.
handslive: (writing)
A novel of, hmm, let's see...Faerie, the mortal realm, Hell (which only appears in cameo roles), and "dragon princes" (née Arthur).  In spite of this, it's a very readable book, but I don't see how a satisfactory ending could have been expected.  Needless to say I didn't get one.  I don't blame the reference to Arthur, although that would be tempting, since he appears rather less than Hell does and without Hell's ties to the plot.  Still, I enjoyed about 90% of it.
handslive: (writing)
This was a really good, if slightly unusual, December issue.  Two excellent and scary stories, one by M. Rickert and the other by Daryl Gregory.  Also a story by Susanna Clarke in the world of Jonathan Strange.
handslive: (writing)
A collection of three "stories" (novels?).  I don't know if it's the translation or the author, but the writing is very sparse.  The first story feels a little rough in that respect, but it grew on me and by the end I was really enjoying it.  Relatively similar approach to plot in each story, but he still got me with the last one.

The similarities with the movie are interesting and the differences even more so.
handslive: (writing)
I'm sorry it took me so long to pick up this book.  [livejournal.com profile] purplejavatroll  kept it in the house, I think, to make sure I actually got around to reading it.  We can give it back to [livejournal.com profile] puppytown  now and I thank her for her patience.  It didn't feel like the book ever misstepped.  The images I have in my head from this book have been combining with images from The Devil's Backbone in the most intriguing ways.
handslive: (writing)
This was in a collection of Alan Garner books (one volume called The Garner Omnibus).  Interesting take on the "kids enter a fantasy world" adventure.  If anything, the depiction of post WW2 suburb life outside London is even weirder than the fantasy elements.  And, I think, it offers a reminder of how little we understand of the electric appliances we use, how the power gets to them, or what it does after it arrives.  An updated version of this, with slightly more realistic adults, would be a creepy little story.
handslive: (writing)
And then we stopped by Greenwoods and bought the latest LMB.  And I went and read it straight away.  Heh.  So, fine, where's the next one?
handslive: (writing)
Okay, so this wasn't a sequel to Felaheen.  I guessed what was going on as soon as he gave us a substantive flashback, but it was still enjoyable.  But then I love his writing style. Also, Amazon does not have a consistent listing for Mr. Grimwood largely because he is sometimes referred to as "Jon C Grimwood" and sometimes as "Jon Courtney Grimwood" [sic]. This is especially interesting when a graphic of the book cover (and the correct spelling of the name) are available immediately to the left of the typo. Did they switch to "C" because their data entry people just couldn't learn to type the longer version? In any case, there are missing titles (different, of course) under each name.
handslive: (writing)
Man, I'm behind again on tracking what I've read.  There was some good stuff in this issue.  Next post, please.
handslive: (writing)
The blurb on the front says, "The haunting novel of love in Shangri-La."  Which I guess proves that people writing blurbs didn't always read the books back 1972 either when this was reprinted.  Interesting book, especially given that it was first published in 1933.  There's a central vision here of mankind's doom that's based on the view that we will just keep escalating conflict and consumption until these two things destroy us.  There's also this marvelous little exchange:

"'Slacker,'" explained Conway, "is a slang word meaning a lazy fellow, a good-for-nothing. I wasn't, of course, using it seriously."

Chang bowed his thanks for the information. He took a keen interest in languages and liked to weigh a new word philosophically. "It is significant," he said after a pause, "that the English regard slackness as a vice. We, on the other hand, should vastly prefer it to tension. Is there not too much tension in the world at present, and might it not be better if more people were slackers?"
handslive: (writing)
This issue presented three stories by different authors based around an idea provided by Harlan Ellison (who apparently insisted on his own EULA before putting the idea out there).  Those were interesting and completely different takes on the idea, which was good.  There's another John Morressy story (not a Kedrigen story, but still good) from the backlog of his stuff that had been accepted but not published.  Most interesting thing was the excerpts from letters between Ursula Le Guin and James Tiptree Jr. (aka Alice Sheldon).  Lucius Shepard also provides a review of the second movie following Night Watch.  Kind of a mixed review, but it had this interesting line:

"It's as if Dostoyevsky, Marilyn Manson, and Roger Corman were collaborating behind the scenes."

Ouch.  My brain. :-)
handslive: (writing)
Some time back, we picked up 9tail Fox and realized that we were missing a book from the set.  I finally broke down and ordered Felaheen since it seemed Greenwoods was never going to have a copy of it on the shelf.

I really liked the other two books in this series and this one was also very good.  He's got great use of language and his alternate history has produced a very interesting world.  The best part is I can go ahead and read the next one now.
handslive: (writing)
I've been reading this book for probably 4 months.  That's not a criticism of the book really, except that the trade paperback is huge and, therefore, hard to carry around.  This was an interesting book in three parts.  Most of it is told in an autobiographical form, so there's a lot of first person point of view.  Unfortunately, the narrators are not likable or easy to relate to.  In point of fact, they're all fucked up.  Still, Roberts suggests some interesting ideas about how man might begin the colonization of space if a relatively inexpensive way of achieving orbit were available.
handslive: (writing)
If I need more reasons why I shouldn't always believe a review, this book would be one of them.  The review I'd read decribed this as (paraphrasing here) adequate.  But adequate for LMB is a lot of fun.

To give you an idea how behind I am with my book list, this was the book I read at Berg Lake.
handslive: (coding)
This looks like a self published effort.  There's a few typos, punctuation and grammatical errors.  It's somewhat loosely organized and gives the impression of being text pulled straight off of Dr. Cohen's slides for the university level course he teaches on information security.

This was also a quick, highly educational read.  I don't completely agree with everything in the "Countering Internet Scams" section and some items are a little dated.  Still, I'm loaning it to the former auditor who works across the hall from me.

This is very nearly a work-related book (nearly, but not quite).  I've avoided listing the work related books I've been reading here.  Like the one on Role-Based Access Controls (RBAC).  Or Sun's Core Security Patterns.  Or the CISSP study guide I picked up.
handslive: (writing)
Another Gaunt and Bone story by Chris Willrich.  Haven't seen one in far too long.  Another Albert E. Cowdrey story in New Orleans.
handslive: (writing)
Saw this one in Greenwoods in a nice trade paperback edition.  The back of the book makes it sound very much like a certain kind of book, but the inside is something else.  I picked it up mostly because of the first 3 or 4 pages.  The narrator was interesting and pulled me in right away.

It was very good.  I have one little problem with the story overall, but I'm hoping to lend the book around and don't want to mess with anyone else's experience it.
handslive: (writing)
Started this one on the camping trip, got side tracked, and just finished it.

In the book review column, James Sallis writes about River of Gods by Ian McDonald.  On that basis, I think I should seek this book out.  The quotes from the book are, um, tantalizing.

Really great story by Ysabeau S. Wilce called The Lineaments of Gratified Desire.  The editor's notes say they've published an earlier story with the same characters in Feb 2004.  Hmmm, must have missed it.  I'm sure I'd have remembered a little girl named Tiny Doom and her companion Pig.
handslive: (writing)
So, this is a high fantasy novel and we've got the usual suspects.  Boy chosen out by destiny, leaves stricken poverty and abuse to rise to be a prince of the nation, faithful sidekick with a dark secret, and so on.  It's also a first novel for the author, which may explain the format.  And I liked it a little.  I probably shouldn't have purchased the trade paperback, but it was an entertaining enough read.  Interesting if not wholly original magic/god/animism thing going on that I liked the additional detail around.  Supposed to be the first of a series (no surprise), but this novel was a relatively complete package with no agonizing cliffhangers.
handslive: (writing)
Finished this one during the camping trip.  Fun little Albert E. Cowdry bit in his New Orleans universe (which I love).  A fucking marvelous horror piece by Laird Barron (Hallucigenia).  And another lovely movie review by Lucius Shepard (even if he does end up reviewing BloodRayne -- which sounds so bad I might have to rent it).
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